2021 Festival 8-18 July

Shark Discovery On Otago Harbour


Learn about the sharks that visit the Otago Harbour! With more than 200 shark species found around the world and more than 60 of those found in NZ waters, this is an awesome opportunity to get a new insight into our amazing shark diversity.

In partnership with New Zealand marine Studies Centre, join an onboard expert from the NZ Marine Studies Centre who will show us how data scientists study shark diversity! After dropping BRUV (Baited Remote Underwater Video) cameras from the Sootychaser, we will then cruise to the NZ Marine Studies Centre to view the footage. Investigate the form and function of sharks inside and out by viewing teeth, egg cases, skin under the microscope and taking part in a shark dissection for those who are interested. You will also receive information on how to continue to be part of shark conservation by contributing to the Shark Spy citizen science project.

Please note – Shark abundance is extremely varied in the harbour, so there is no guarantee we will capture any footage of sharks on the day. No sharks are harmed for this educational session. The sharks for dissection were obtained as bycatch from fishermen.

Event is 2 hours duration


Prices:

Adults $55

Childen $28

Target age: 8+ years

 

Times:

9.30am-11:30am-Departs Back Beach, Port Chalmers (39 Peninsula Beach Road) at 9:30am

1:00pm–3.15pm Departs from Portobello, New Zealand Marine Studies Centre (Hatchery Road, Portobello) at 1:00pm


Includes admission to the marine studies centre, touch tanks, shark dissection, and a cruise on Sootychaser to drop the underwater video camera (and for those joining from Port Chalmers, return ferry trip in conjunction with the cruise to drop the underwater camera).

If you prefer to join a tour time listed above from a different location, please write this in your booking NOTES and we will be in touch to confirm what time departure will be from the alternative pick up. (No extra cost.)

Please be aware this is a live webcam operating at the Marine Studies Centre for footage of the creatures here, which may inadvertently also capture footage of visitors and staff as we move around the centre.

It is able to be viewed at www.marine.ac.nz